Maple & Buttered Pecan Pie Cobbler

Nov 2015

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Let me start off by warning you: this dessert can lead to tight pants. And by “can” – I mean it probably will.

I can’t think of a better way to achieve a little tightness than with this twist on a Thanksgiving dessert tradition. At least pecan pie is a tradition at my family’s dessert table – especially since we have our very own pecan farm. Well, calling it a farm may be a slight exaggeration, but those 7 trees on that 2-acre stretch of perfect Okie earth yield the sweetest, most delectable harvest I have ever tasted. The real trick with having your personal pecan production is gathering them faster than the squirrels.

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In our family, the record for most pecans gathered in one afternoon stands at whopping 1,119 pecans ((all gathered in one back-breaking afternoon)). Guess who holds that record ((wink, wink))??  I am not sure which part was harder – gathering or keeping count as I gathered. According to my dad ((the pecan expert)), 70 pecans make a pound. Now that I am thinking about it, after gathering & hauling 16 lbs of pecans around for a few hours, tight pants shouldn’t be a concern! Bring on the dessert table!

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This pecan pie meets country cobbler recipe not only uses my homegrown pecans, it also uses pure maple sirup from my sis-in-law’s ((Betsy)) family maple sirup producing farm.  Although a typical pecan pie is made using dark corn syrup & white cane sugar ((at least that is the case in my neck of the woods)), the pure maple sirup & brown sugar used in this recipe sings of autumn in the most perfect way. The key is using the darkest ((PURE)) maple sirup you can find.  The darker the color, the stronger the flavor.

((Wondering why I keep spelling it “SIRUP”? Read all about my favorite pure maple sirup HERE))

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With a shortlist of high quality ingredients and a few pantry staples, this dessert is going in your oven in no time. First, mix together the biscuit batter ingredients:

  • self rising flour
  • sugar
  • milk

Be sure to reserve a few teaspoons of milk in order to adjust the thickness of the batter. ((I reached the perfect consistency with a few teaspoons remaining in the measuring cup.))

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Spread the batter into the bottom of a buttered 9″ x 13″ baker. I prefer enameled cast-iron for this recipe, but glass or porcelain will make a good substitute ((these may require a few extra minutes of baking time, so keep a close eye during those last few minutes in the oven)). 

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Next, combine the pecan pie ingredients:

  • maple sirup
  • brown sugar ((I always use pure cane))
  • eggs
  • vanilla
  • pinch of salt

Whisk all of these ingredients together – and let’s not forget the star ingredient!

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Fold in the pecan halves and pour the mixture over the biscuit batter.

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After the pecan filling is poured over the batter, one last ingredient is waiting to be used: melted butter. Simply drizzle that stick of melted ((salted)) butter over the top of the filling. Place the cobbler on a parchment lined baking sheet ((this will keep your oven clean just in case the cobbler overflows — mine didn’t overflow, but better safe than scrubbing a dirty oven!!)) & into a preheated oven. 

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There is a fun bit of magic that occurs while this recipe is baking – the top sinks to the bottom & the bottom rises to the top. This little switcharoo causes the pie filling to thicken slightly and also gives a whisper of that pure maple sirup flavor to the sweet and fluffy biscuit crust.

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But my favorite part? Some of the pecans stay on top where they get coated in butter and lightly toasted while others sink into the maple sirup filling. It is heavenly.

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Isn’t it beautiful? And with the first bite it becomes clear, pure maple sirup is the perfect partner for the pecans. Such a simple, rustic dessert — the perfect end to a wonderful Thanksgiving feast. Now if I could just have a few more hours of pecan gathering to make up for all of the extra dessert servings I plan on enjoying!

Maple & Buttered Pecan Pie Cobbler
Serves 12
Buttery pecans, pure maple sirup filling & a sweet and fluffy biscuit topping -- pecan pie has never tasted so good!
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
35 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
35 min
Sweet Biscuit Crust
  1. 1 1/2 c self rising flour
  2. 1 c sugar
  3. 1 c whole milk (less 1-2 t)
Pecan Pie Filling
  1. 5 eggs
  2. 2 c pure maple sirup (the darker the better)
  3. 1 c packed brown sugar
  4. 2 t vanilla
  5. 1 pinch salt
  6. 2 c pecan halves
  7. 1 stick butter, melted (I prefer salted butter)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375┬░. Butter a 9" x 13" oval or rectangular baking dish*. Combine biscuit crust ingredients taking care not to add all of the milk at once**. When mixing these 3 ingredients,be careful not to over mix, which can lead to a tough biscuit topping. Pour the biscuit batter into the baking dish, taking care to spread evenly.
  2. Although my photos don't show this step, I recommend whisking the eggs prior to adding them to the remaining filling ingredients. In a medium bowl, combine whisked eggs, sirup, brown sugar, vanilla & salt. Stir vigorously to combine. Add pecans and stir to coat. Pour pecan pie filling over the biscuit batter & drizzle melted butter over the pecan filling. Place on a parchment lined baking sheet & into a preheated oven for 30-40 minutes or until the center is not quite set. I found 35 minutes to be the perfect amount of time.
  3. Once the center has baked to the point that a slight wiggle remains, remove from the oven and allow to cool 30 minutes to 1 hour prior to serving.
  4. Serves 12
Notes
  1. *I prefer enameled cast-iron but glass or porcelain are a good substitute. Baking time may need to be adjusted slightly according to the baking dish material you choose.
  2. **I had a remainder of 2 teaspoons of milk once the perfect batter consistency was reached.
Adapted from Food for a Year
Adapted from Food for a Year
Sinkology http://www.sinkology.com/